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The Hundred ( a thread for the discussion of the ECB's new franchise competition)
#1
As requested, and a progmatic solution, until we can have a new section, a thread for the ECB's new franchise competition.
While Robert may be dead, Robert was not all Mugabe's.
There are GOOD Mugabe's
It is Warwickshire County Cricket Club!
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#2
The tournament is s*i*

Tournament discussed...and thread closed.

Thank you and good night
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Leicester Exile
#3
I disagree that the thread should be closed.
While the tournament, and form of cricket, may not be to our taste. The ecb have invested many millions into the project, and it will have a massive impact on the rest of the first class game in England.
Surely it is worthwhile to discuss the impact of this format on the rest of cricket?
While Robert may be dead, Robert was not all Mugabe's.
There are GOOD Mugabe's
It is Warwickshire County Cricket Club!
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#4
Matthew Engel can be relied on for a barbed comment or two:
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/blog/2...ed-cricket
Views on here are my own; but you can keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#5
At the end of the day, Terry, I do believe he is saying what a lot of cricket lovers are thinking.
My forecast is it will be a financial disaster because it will not attract the viewing figures to satisfy BBC and after the initial novelty the only way grounds will get filled is by providing loads of free tickets.
LE - aka John
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#6
I actually think the crowds will be ok ...they will eventually push games to the Friday after work crowd

Whilst the crowds will be ok, it will be against the intial objectives of a 'family' environment.
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parkfield bear
#7
This was George Dobell's written submission to the DCMS committee that grilled Graves and Harrison this week. Hope George doesn't mind me posting the text as the link to the HOP website downloads the PDF.


Quote:Written evidence submitted by George Dobell
The ECB’s current strategy represents a huge and unnecessary risk to the future of the game
in England and Wales.
While the ECB’s initial motivation may well have been good – something needed to be done
to ensure the game remained relevant – their course of action amounts to little more than a
reckless gamble.
The new competition (The Hundred) in itself is not a major problem. It will still pit bat v
ball; it will still (given good weather and good pitches) offer decent entertainment. There is
no reason why ensuring more people watch it will not attract more people into a love of the
sport. It’s still a great game.
The problem is more the sacrifices being made for it.
Consider the domestic 50-over competition. Having built towards the World Cup for four
years (since the debacle of the 2015 tournament), the ECB have responded to England’s
success by all but abandoning the format. If that sounds like hyperbole remember this: in
2020, the best 90 or so England limited-over players will no longer be available to play
domestic 50-over cricket as it coincides with The Hundred. That means that our next
generation of ODI players – the very people we want to represent the team at the 2023 and
2027 World Cups – may NEVER play a domestic 50-over game. What possible chance are we
giving them to compete against the best in the world in this format? Where is the legacy for
the World Cup triumph? It is a puzzling strategy.
The County Championship fares little better in their plans. In an attempt to make space for
the window in the schedule in which to play The Hundred, the Championship (the
competition which develops Test players) will increasingly be played in the margins of the
season. That means it will be played, on the whole, in April, May and September, which the
pitches and weather conditions render life almost impossibly hard for batsmen and provide
disproportionate assistance for the sort of medium-paced seam bowlers who had little use on
the far better pitches prevalent in Test cricket. Especially Test cricket played abroad.
It is, therefore, no exaggeration to state that the ECB’s current strategy threatens to
compromise the ability of England to remain competitive in this format. It therefore threatens
the viability of Test cricket to remain an attractive prospect to broadcasters. The ECB really
are likely to be responsible for the decline of the oldest and most revered format of the
international game. As Test cricket remains, at present, the most lucrative form of the game
for the ECB, this is another extremely risky approach.
And then there’s the T20 Blast. This has been a huge success story in recent years. Despite
little support from the governing body (you may recall the ECB chairman renouncing it as
‘mediocre’), attendances have grown by more than 50% over the last four years. With a little
nurturing (and some free to air exposure), the format could provide a wonderful vehicle for
growth and engagement. Evidence from all over the word suggests it works. Instead, it is
being pushed into the earlier months of the summer and relegated to secondary status. Our
governing body’s failure to promote and nurture their own product is bewildering.
So why go for The Hundred? Well, it’s a bit shorter. And that matters. Free to air
broadcasters wanted both something a bit different (partly because the ECB have tainted the
reputation of their own product; remember Colin Graves’ “mediocre” comments) and a bit
shorter to fit into their schedules and appeal to a new audience. Bit with a tiny bit of
comprising – time clocks; perhaps shortened run-ups for bowlers as we used to see in the
Sunday League – the T20 format could have been made to work. The cynic might suggest the
incentive of personal bonuses has been vital in securing the support of key officials at the
ECB. It sometimes seems hard to find anyone outside the governing body or the relevant
broadcasters who believe The Hundred is a good idea.
There are too many risks inherent in The Hundred’s scheduling. Despite the former ECB
chairman, David Morgan, producing a report earlier this decade which made it clear that
spectators desired predictability in the fixture list (ie, games at specific times on specific days
– such as 6.30 pm Friday night or 2pm on Saturday afternoon) and some spread between
matches (so there was not too much commitment required from them in terms of time or
spending in a short space of time), the ECB have instead opted for games on every night of
the week. It is what the broadcasters prefer of course, but risks alienating supporters (have
you ever met one who said ‘what cricket needs is a new format’? No, nor me) and puts the
entire competition as the risk of poor weather. Look what happened when The Blast was
played in a window and was hit by a wet summer in 2012. Attendances fell sharply. If the
opening days of The Hundred are similarly affected, all the momentum of the competition
will be negative. Like the BBC show Eldorado or the Millennium Dome: damaged by poor
PR before they were born.
Meanwhile, the traditional teams – the first-class counties – will be relegated to secondary
competitions. Yes, they will benefit from short-term gain (the £1.3m inducement offered for
their support), but in the medium-term (those payments only last five years), the decision to
bring in eight new team identities threatens to cannibalise the game and could see cricket
disappear from some areas of the country.
What evidence do we have that the public wanted new team identifies? What evidence do we
have to suggest existing supporters will accept them? What evidence is there of a success of
such a policy in other sports in the UK? It seems to me the evidence suggests quite the
opposite. And remember this: the county CEOs originally voted for a change which would see
the T20 Blast played over two divisions with relegation and promotion. It was only after a
chairmen’s meeting (chaired by Colin Graves) that this approach was abandoned. Isn’t it a bit
odd that several counties were close to bankruptcy while the ECB retained reserves of nearly
£80m? Isn’t it reasonable to suggest a possibility that these counties were kept poor in order
to ensure their compliance?
The governance of the ECB is probably relevant here. Are we really comfortable with
Yorkshire – a county that disproportionately benefits from the introduction of The Hundred -
owing Colin Graves family trusts circa £20m? Are we comfortable that the decision to strip
Durham of their rights to host Test cricket also benefited Yorkshire disproportionately, as it
reduced competition for such games among the northern grounds? Are we comfortable that
Graves also chairs the ECB’s nominations committee so effectively has a veto on who joins
the board? Are there not reasonable questions here about potential conflicts of interest?
The ‘extra’ money coming into the game is fool’s gold. Look how the ECB’s reserves have
plummeted (from somewhere around £78m a couple of years ago to somewhere around £0
now). Look how the ECB were forced to suspend the introduction of the new central contracts
(for England players) from October to February due to cash-flow issues. The start-up costs of
The Hundred (which have more than trebled since first quoted), the number of new staff (and
consultants) employed to ‘ensure’ its success and inflationary demands from player salaries
will eat up this ‘new money’. And while the ECB will tell you, with some justification, the
counties are benefitting, the total remuneration package for the ECB CEO (salary, pension
and expenses) is now believed to surpass the entire salary bill for several first-class counties.
Disability cricket, for example, is not gaining an extra pound from the new broadcast deal.
Nor is recreational cricket. How can that be termed a success?
There is very little wrong with the game of cricket in England and Wales that could not be
resolved with more of the sport broadcast live on free to air platforms. It was the ECB’s
strategy of selling the game exclusively to a subscription broadcaster that inflicted the
damage. The ECB’s strategy of betting the farm on a new competition no-one wanted could
well compound the issue.
A refreshed T20 competition – and, perhaps, a new FA Cup style knockout T20 competition –
would have been far safer, more appropriate methods by which to grow the game. It may not
be too late to pursue them.
George Dobell, Senior Correspondent ESPNcricinfo and founder of the Cricket Supporters’
Association.
October 2019.
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Bald Reynard, parkfield bear, The Good Mugabe
#8
I smell some more material for m'learned friends in George's comments!

But that wasn't the point I wanted to make today. I had worried that it was just us old purists that grumbled about The Hundred and that we had to accept that we were dinosaurs on the way out. This week, though, I picked my grandchildren up from school and was chatting to a playground mum before school finished. I know this mum to be an occasional visitor to Taunton to watch Somerset so, perhaps, just the type of "family" person the ECB are allegedly courting. She had been reading about the draft. Without any prompting from me, she launched into a tirade worthy of the least convinced of us. "No one wants to watch Cardiff". "Players sponsored by PomBears is just daft". "I won't be going". And so on. If this is the reaction of the target audience, the Hundred is in serious trouble.
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#9
Once again George hits the nail slap bang in the middle. He raises several issues I had not even thought about and which just adds to my belief The Hundred will not only fail but, in the meantime, cause financial damage to the game as a whole.

And yes, GB, I could be classed as a dinosaur but I like to think I can accept change in my dotage. I welcomed the 40 over game and how it became a massive attraction to kids (I took my grandson from the age of 6) and still regret its passing. I have enjoyed the 50 and 60 over formats. Although not a great lover of the T20 format I have enjoyed quite a games and Finals Day is the highlight of the domestic season. In fact Finals Day should be on Free-to-View and be the big advert for the game.

Is there no-one in the game able to call a halt to Graves ?
LE - aka John
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Bald Reynard
#10
One of the Phoenix Board members departs his day job under mysterious circumstances:
https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/...cumstances
Views on here are my own; but you can keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#11
I think that George has been quite clever.  What he has said in his submission is similar to the article that produced a threat from Mr. Graves of legal action.  But, according to Wikipedia,
"Parliamentary privilege applies to select committees. Written and oral evidence given to, and published by these committees is also subject to the same absolute privilege as parliamentary papers. This means that any evidence given by a witness to a select committee may not be used against them or any other person in a court of law, whether for civil or criminal proceedings."
In other words, Mr Graves has to take it on the chin and has no recourse. 
He must be absolutely furious.
Views on here are my own; but you can keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#12
George for PM
LE - aka John
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#13
Personally I don’t mind the Hundred if it helps Warwickshire return to playing as Warwickshire in T20.

Surely there can’t be two Birminghams?
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Bald Reynard
#14
(27-10-2019, 08:29 PM)Jon Wrote: Personally I don’t mind the Hundred if it helps Warwickshire return to playing as Warwickshire in T20.

Surely there can’t be two Birminghams?

...unless this is the thin end of the wedge and the secret plan is for the eight teams to become the basis for all red and white ball cricket, with the counties fading away. 
Not that I think that the ECB could be responsible for anything so dastardly and underhand; but you never know!
Views on here are my own; but you can keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#15
(28-10-2019, 10:39 AM)Terry Wrote:
(27-10-2019, 08:29 PM)Jon Wrote: Personally I don’t mind the Hundred if it helps Warwickshire return to playing as Warwickshire in T20.

Surely there can’t be two Birminghams?

...unless this is the thin end of the wedge and the secret plan is for the eight teams to become the basis for all red and white ball cricket, with the counties fading away. 
Not that I think that the ECB could be responsible for anything so dastardly and underhand; but you never know!

To be honest I’m more cynical about the motives of our lot than ECB!

Just wish we could get more people involved who understand the history of the Club.
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#16
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/50211381

...and so it begins. Topley gets a reported £60,000 a year after being drafted to play for the "Oval Invincibles" in the Hundred and then just happens to agree a contract with Surrey, turning down the offer to stay at Sussex (Who stood with him throughout his injuries)

The Hundred will cause irrevesible damage to the smaller counties.
Bears fan, Wolves fan, blood red Socialist, a not so vital statistician...
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#17
(28-10-2019, 11:20 PM)randombear Wrote: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/50211381

...and so it begins. Topley gets a reported £60,000 a year after being drafted to play for the "Oval Invincibles" in the Hundred and then just happens to agree a contract with Surrey, turning down the offer to stay at Sussex (Who stood with him throughout his injuries)

The Hundred will cause irrevesible damage to the smaller counties.

I worry it won't just be the smaller counties that will suffer. Too much money is being spent promoting The Hundred
LE - aka John
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#18
(28-10-2019, 11:20 PM)randombear Wrote: https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/50211381

...and so it begins. Topley gets a reported £60,000 a year after being drafted to play for the "Oval Invincibles" in the Hundred and then just happens to agree a contract with Surrey, turning down the offer to stay at Sussex (Who stood with him throughout his injuries)

The Hundred will cause irrevesible damage to the smaller counties.

In fairness, the move of Topley to Surrey was announced well before the draft for The Hundred took place.
Proud to be a Bear
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#19
Chris Cooke almost says that he really would prefer to be playing for someone else:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/50307113
'He admits that it would have been easier from a family perspective to remain based in Cardiff, with his wife Nic having just given birth to their second girl.
"My wife would have enjoyed me being more local, and I would have known the conditions here (at Sophia Gardens), and that's always an advantage," said Cooke.
"Glamorgan and Cardiff are my second home, and it will be strange going to a different team, but you've got to see it as having nothing to do with county cricket."'
Views on here are my own; but you can keep up-to-date with County Cricket at http://deepextracover.com/
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#20
LOL... those self claimed purists who failed to embrace both redball and T20 cricket have been rewarded with the hundred.
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